Tucked away behind 176 Mollison Street, Kyneton, Victoria . Book direct on 0411 555 644 or through the website

WELCOME TO DESTINATION KYNETON!

Your accommodation is a one hour drive from Melbourne. It is conveniently positioned in the main street for business guests, holidayers, wedding guests and tradies. The car park is large enough to hold trucks which can be locked in overnight.

> Split system heating and cooling
> Multiple layers of insulation for hot dry summers and cold icy winters
> WiFi
> Recycled, polished old Australian redgum timber hardwood floors that came out of the ceiling
> Electric blankets
> Private bathroom
> Kitchenette with fresh breakfast provisions including eggs from our resident chooks
> Nespresso coffee machine
> A very comfortable Queen size bed for one or two Guests
> Private courtyard
> Original artwork
> Flat screen TV
> Crisp cotton sheets, towels and organic toiletries
> Onsite secure parking
> Leave the car in our car park and walk over the road to the Piper Street Restaurant and Cafe zone.


There are over 40 places to eat within one kilometer of Destination Kyneton, from takeways, hotels, cafes, bistros, pizzas and chef hat-awarded restaurants using the best of fresh local produce. 

Your self-contained cottage is named HARRY'S after Harry Portelli, rabbit man, who came out from Malta when WW11 was on. Harry lived here very humbly from 1944 to the late 1960's. He ended up owning a seriously large number of Kyneton properties from the rabbit processing business he set up in the red brick building out the front. Everything was paid in cash. 

This original and historical town accommodation was built in the 1930's. It is hidden away from street view down the back, down the driveway behind the commercial Mollison Street red brick frontage. It surprises quite a few people for the right reasons. 

Now, Harry's features creature comforts for Guests, including:

See you here in Kyneton.







YOU ARE WALKING IN CAROLINE CHISHOLM'S FOOTSTEPS

The remarkable Mrs Caroline Chisholm was known for helping over 40,000 new immigrants to Australia, starting in Sydney in the wild days of the 1830's, around 45 years after the First Fleet arrived. This was achieved mostly single-handedly and despite great opposition from the male ruling class. Her portrait was on the Australian five dollar note. 

She saw the women arriving as free settlers in the colony had no support and soon became destitute. Mrs Chisholm did not take no for an answer and obtained a building that housed 94 women in the military barracks of Hyde Park. It is still there today. She trained up each of the women to become qualified domestic servants. She then took them on her horse and dray to get them proper jobs on farms, as far away as Yass. This turned into whole families getting jobs as the farms needed labourers. Around a million Australians today can trace their origins back to being helped by Caroline Chisholm. She did more to practically assist people than the combined Governors of the Colony of NSW at the time. 

The Chisholm's returned to England to recover and came back to Australia to Kyneton in the 1850's.

Mrs Chisholm had the 1855 bluestone building on this property sturdily constructed as The Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages. This was when gold miners arriving from around the world walked past its front door on the dangerous 11 day journey from Hobson's Bay, Port Melbourne, up Mt Alexander Road, to the bustling and rich gold fields of Mt Alexander and Bendigo. Mollison Street Kyneton was the Calder Highway until the freeway bypass in 1996.

Mrs Chisholm saw the need for shelter for the struggling miners. She organized funding by public subscription so that she would not be beholden to donors. She had 11 shelter sheds built for miners on this perilous journey, each a days walk apart. Miners paid their sixpence and were safe for the night. The first shelter was in Essendon which was in bandit country. Other shelter locations were Keilor, Diggers Rest, Woodend, around the corner in Piper Street, two in Malsmbury and others along the journey. 

She had seven children while helping tens of thousands of people. Five lived. Two sons set up a provisions store in a building now occupied by Sacred Heart College in High Street. Her husband Archibald was the magistrate at the old bluestone Kyneton Courthouse in nearby Hutton Street, where later Ned Kelly was sentenced to death for bush-ranging. Such is life. It is still Kyneton's functioning court house today.

You can see the small stone cell Kelly was held in at the front of the police station in Jennings Street.

It was later used for overnight gold bullion storage (there were stables in the back yard), the RSL had it from 1918 to 1926 until the wives found out what was going on inside at night, the two old Miss Hogan sisters lived in it in the 1930's and it was a boot makers shop. Laurie Turner had it done up nicely in the early 1970's as a residence after Harry died. He could not get the Certificate of Occupancy from the council which resulted in a bitter feud. Laurie ripped it apart, including the verandah over the foot path. It has since been a ruin of four dead straight walls for 63 years.

This solid bluestone ruin at 174 Mollison Street is called Caroline Chisholm House. It is awaiting restoration as two additional visitor accommodation apartments for Destination Kyneton. It is the only remaining bluestone shop and dwelling in Mollison Street. The architect's plans for it are on the bedside table in the accommodation. 




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